We will be issued an EHCP!

A huge relief, super happy but tinged with a bit of sadness. I think that sums up my feelings when I found out that Bam was going to be issued an EHCP. My boy will have the support to spread his wings and fly! (hence the photo)

I had a few moments before Mops finished school, I was in my car with no little ears flapping so I called the local authority on the off chance that they might have an update on Bam’s application.

I actually didn’t expect them to give me an update. I just expected them to say that it’s still being processed. So when she said ‘Oooh, we have an update for you’ I began to mentally prepare myself for the news that we wouldn’t receive an EHCP.

So when she told me that the local authority have decided to issue an EHCP, I was actually speechless – A rare occurrence, I know!

A massive weight had just been lifted off of my shoulders – I could actually feel months of anxiety and stress start to ease. No longer did I have to worry about him entering the world of secondary education because he’ll get some help, somebody will be there to make sure he’s ok. He will have some help with the massive transition he was about to face, he will have some support managing the change from 1 teacher per day to 6 teachers a day.

This sounds selfish but it’s also a relief to know that I won’t have to constantly be in the school making sure the teachers are aware of the things he needs additional support with. The EHCP will mean that they’ll be aware of his needs and what they’ll need to put in place to help him.

At the beginning of this blog I said that I felt relief, happiness and also a little bit of sadness. I think the sadness comes from the fact that he needs an EHCP at all. I’m a little bit sad that he can’t just go to the school that everybody else goes to. It’s just another example of how special needs children and parents can feel isolated.

I’m going to put those feelings to one side and focus on the positives. This is amazing news for Bam and we’re very lucky to have been issued the EHCP. I was always be thankful for that!

Next step – reviewing the draft EHCP…what that involves I don’t really know. Another in depth research session is on the horizon. I’ll keep you posted….

 

Advertisements

Awaiting EHCP decision

I’m waiting for the Education, Health and Care plan (EHCP) decision to enter my inbox – it’s due on Monday but the local authority have warned me that there may be a delay of a few days.

It’s really putting me on edge…we’ve been told that Bam’s application is borderline so I’m aware we might not be successful. If we’re not successful, what does that mean?

Yes, we can appeal but then that takes another 2 months to do and we still may not be any further forward at the end of it! To be honest, I’m exhausted from the whole process too, will have to dig deep to find the energy to fight again if we have to go to appeal.

While this is all going on we have to make the decision about his secondary school place. We have been offered a place at the school where he would receive specialist support should we be successful with the EHCP but none of his friends will be going to this school.

So if we don’t get the EHCP, should we consider the school where his friends will be? Are his friendships more important for his wellbeing than the hope of some additional support.

Big decisions ahead…please can somebody pass the parenting manual?!

Supporting the sibling of a special needs child

When you have a child with special needs, they can quite quickly and easily become the focus of your attention.

They need extra support to keep up with daily life, they need extra understanding because sometimes they’re not able to keep up with daily life and they need extra energy because sometimes life can be tough and challenging.

As a parent you dig deep and find that extra support, understanding and energy. You invest everything you can because you want them to be the best that they can be.

While all this is going on, there is your other child, the one without the special needs, without the need for extra support, understanding and energy…but actually that’s not true, they really do need that additional support too!

I’ve realised recently that maybe Mops needs that bit of extra support – after all he’s contending with a lot more than his peers. Maybe he needs a bit more time. Maybe he needs a bit of additional understanding. I’ve always done my best to give him the time that he needs but as he’s got older his needs have changed and I need to change my approach.  

I don’t have the answers, I don’t think I ever will but we’ll work through it, meanwhile, Mops, know that I think you are beyond amazing! You make me smile every day and are the best little brother EVER.

Love you to the moon and back and back again x

Receiving a high functioning autism diagnosis

I walked into the doctor’s surgery feeling a bit nervous. I didn’t know what to expect, I just knew we would be there for two hours and that they were going to do two types of assessment. I didn’t know what the assessments would involve, I hadn’t prepared myself for the emotional impact either – It’s hard to discuss your son’s behaviours in so much detail with a stranger.

Bam was taken to a different room to be assessed by a speech therapist and a psychologist. I hadn’t prepared myself for him to be on his own…I wanted to be there to support him. It was a very long hour sat in the waiting room, wondering if he was ok, wondering what he was thinking. The second hour, the three of us sat and spoke to the doctor. We discussed Bam’s behaviour in detail.

Then towards the end of the hour, literally five minutes from the end of our appointment, Bam was diagnosed with high functioning autism.  It wasn’t a total surprise so why did I feel so shocked when the doctor announced he was in no doubt that Bam was autistic. Maybe it was hearing it out loud, maybe it was because it was now confirmed, maybe it was because he was so confident in his diagnosis.

We left the doctor’s surgery and I felt numb…my brain was busy processing this new piece of information. What did it mean, how would it help? Would it help at all? How would we explain it to Bam and Mops. Had we done the right thing seeking the diagnosis?

At that point in time, when the doctor tells you your child has autism, you just feel totally overwhelmed. There’s so many questions, so many things you want to know but the doctor hasn’t got the time to answer the questions. Also, I didn’t want to ask lots of questions in front of Bam because I wanted to tell him in a way that he would understand, in an environment that he felt comfortable in.

So you walk out the doctors surgery feeling numb….feeling overwhelmed….feeling emotional….