Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP), the first hurdle!

I’ve been patiently waiting but it’s always in the back of my mind. Will the local authority grant my request for an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) for my son?

Many people told me it would be a waste of time applying for an EHCP because he’s bright and meeting all age-related expectations academically. This is very true but he struggles every day to access the curriculum. He struggles to access the curriculum because it’s difficult for him to manage his emotions, he struggles to organise himself and his Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can hinder his ability to focus.

He manages at primary school, but I worry how he would find the transition would into a secondary school provision. Secondary school is a whole new ball game – several teachers per day, moving to a different classroom every hour and attending a much bigger school.  

We’re extremely lucky that one of our local schools does have a high functioning autism provision. The child attends mainstream school but gets the specialist support they need from the specialist function.  I met with the head teacher of the specialist provision. As she explained how it worked, I realised how perfect it would be for him.

So, I felt I had to try and get him the support…if I tried and didn’t get it then I have done all I possibly could! If I didn’t try I would never know…and if things didn’t work out for him in secondary school, I would wonder if I had let him down because I hadn’t applied!

So, I applied…6 long weeks ago. People have told me to put it to the back of my mind, try not to think about it but it’s always there.

The whole process takes 20 weeks. After 6 weeks you are informed if the local authority is going to assess the child further. If they decide to progress they then carry out a more detailed assessment on your child and will let you know if they are going to grant the EHCP after a total of 20 weeks.

So the 6 week mark is here – the first hurdle. I called the local authority last week to see how his application was progressing. The lady went to check on the application and when she came back to the phone and said ‘I’m pleased to tell you, we are going to be taking the application further…..’ I instantly felt a huge amount of relief, they wanted to assess him further, I am one step closer to getting the help that he needs.

I know the journey is far from over…it’s long, it’s stressful and it’s a lot of work. Please send your positive thoughts for stage 2….I’ll keep you posted!

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Receiving a high functioning autism diagnosis

I walked into the doctor’s surgery feeling a bit nervous. I didn’t know what to expect, I just knew we would be there for two hours and that they were going to do two types of assessment. I didn’t know what the assessments would involve, I hadn’t prepared myself for the emotional impact either – It’s hard to discuss your son’s behaviours in so much detail with a stranger.

Bam was taken to a different room to be assessed by a speech therapist and a psychologist. I hadn’t prepared myself for him to be on his own…I wanted to be there to support him. It was a very long hour sat in the waiting room, wondering if he was ok, wondering what he was thinking. The second hour, the three of us sat and spoke to the doctor. We discussed Bam’s behaviour in detail.

Then towards the end of the hour, literally five minutes from the end of our appointment, Bam was diagnosed with high functioning autism.  It wasn’t a total surprise so why did I feel so shocked when the doctor announced he was in no doubt that Bam was autistic. Maybe it was hearing it out loud, maybe it was because it was now confirmed, maybe it was because he was so confident in his diagnosis.

We left the doctor’s surgery and I felt numb…my brain was busy processing this new piece of information. What did it mean, how would it help? Would it help at all? How would we explain it to Bam and Mops. Had we done the right thing seeking the diagnosis?

At that point in time, when the doctor tells you your child has autism, you just feel totally overwhelmed. There’s so many questions, so many things you want to know but the doctor hasn’t got the time to answer the questions. Also, I didn’t want to ask lots of questions in front of Bam because I wanted to tell him in a way that he would understand, in an environment that he felt comfortable in.

So you walk out the doctors surgery feeling numb….feeling overwhelmed….feeling emotional….